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Prayer

Holy Jesus, you spoke peace to our sinful world and gave us the gift of reconciliation. Help me follow the example Jesus gave. May my attitudes and actions this week turn hatred to love, conflict to peace, and death to eternal life. Amen.

—The Jesuit prayer team

 

 


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Welcome and Mercy

Sometimes, I believe that we have heard the Parable of the Prodigal Son so often, that we don’t or can’t hear it “anew” when it is used as the Gospel reading in today’s liturgy. What might be new about the parable or to the insights we might glean from it this time around? First, perhaps, is that the Father “divided his property between them.”  What that tells me is that the Father, so respected in a Jewish household, seems to have kept nothing for himself, and now must depend on the brother who remains at home for everything. And, while we are told that the younger son does indeed spend all of his share of the money on “dissolute living.” Then the father is put into the difficult position of defending his younger son–for whose return he had obviously been waiting–to his younger son.

When we have sinned, do we truly believe (as the parable leads us to believe) that God is actually awaiting our return?  Do we believe that God will be as generous, as merciful, and as forgiving as the father in the parable?

—Fr. Michael A. Vincent, SJ, serves as associate pastor of the Church of the Gesuin University Heights, OH.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Lk 15: 1-3, 11-32

Now all the tax collectors and sinners were coming near to listen to him. And the Pharisees and the scribes were grumbling and saying, “This fellow welcomes sinners and eats with them.” So he told them this parable:

Then Jesus said, “There was a man who had two sons. The younger of them said to his father, ‘Father, give me the share of the property that will belong to me.’ So he divided his property between them. A few days later the younger son gathered all he had and traveled to a distant country, and there he squandered his property in dissolute living.

When he had spent everything, a severe famine took place throughout that country, and he began to be in need. So he went and hired himself out to one of the citizens of that country, who sent him to his fields to feed the pigs. He would gladly have filled himself with the pods that the pigs were eating; and no one gave him anything.

But when he came to himself he said, ‘How many of my father’s hired hands have bread enough and to spare, but here I am dying of hunger! I will get up and go to my father, and I will say to him, “Father, I have sinned against heaven and before you; I am no longer worthy to be called your son; treat me like one of your hired hands.”’

So he set off and went to his father. But while he was still far off, his father saw him and was filled with compassion; he ran and put his arms around him and kissed him. Then the son said to him, ‘Father, I have sinned against heaven and before you; I am no longer worthy to be called your son.’

But the father said to his slaves, ‘Quickly, bring out a robe—the best one—and put it on him; put a ring on his finger and sandals on his feet. And get the fatted calf and kill it, and let us eat and celebrate; for this son of mine was dead and is alive again; he was lost and is found!’ And they began to celebrate.

“Now his elder son was in the field; and when he came and approached the house, he heard music and dancing. He called one of the slaves and asked what was going on. He replied, ‘Your brother has come, and your father has killed the fatted calf, because he has got him back safe and sound.’ Then he became angry and refused to go in. His father came out and began to plead with him.

But he answered his father, ‘Listen! For all these years I have been working like a slave for you, and I have never disobeyed your command; yet you have never given me even a young goat so that I might celebrate with my friends. But when this son of yours came back, who has devoured your property with prostitutes, you killed the fatted calf for him!’

Then the father said to him, ‘Son, you are always with me, and all that is mine is yours. But we had to celebrate and rejoice, because this brother of yours was dead and has come to life; he was lost and has been found.’”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 


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March 31, 2019

Lk 15: 1-3, 11-32

Now all the tax collectors and sinners were coming near to listen to him. And the Pharisees and the scribes were grumbling and saying, “This fellow welcomes sinners and eats with them.” So he told them this parable:

Then Jesus said, “There was a man who had two sons. The younger of them said to his father, ‘Father, give me the share of the property that will belong to me.’ So he divided his property between them. A few days later the younger son gathered all he had and traveled to a distant country, and there he squandered his property in dissolute living.

When he had spent everything, a severe famine took place throughout that country, and he began to be in need. So he went and hired himself out to one of the citizens of that country, who sent him to his fields to feed the pigs. He would gladly have filled himself with the pods that the pigs were eating; and no one gave him anything.

But when he came to himself he said, ‘How many of my father’s hired hands have bread enough and to spare, but here I am dying of hunger! I will get up and go to my father, and I will say to him, “Father, I have sinned against heaven and before you; I am no longer worthy to be called your son; treat me like one of your hired hands.”’

So he set off and went to his father. But while he was still far off, his father saw him and was filled with compassion; he ran and put his arms around him and kissed him. Then the son said to him, ‘Father, I have sinned against heaven and before you; I am no longer worthy to be called your son.’

But the father said to his slaves, ‘Quickly, bring out a robe—the best one—and put it on him; put a ring on his finger and sandals on his feet. And get the fatted calf and kill it, and let us eat and celebrate; for this son of mine was dead and is alive again; he was lost and is found!’ And they began to celebrate.

“Now his elder son was in the field; and when he came and approached the house, he heard music and dancing. He called one of the slaves and asked what was going on. He replied, ‘Your brother has come, and your father has killed the fatted calf, because he has got him back safe and sound.’ Then he became angry and refused to go in. His father came out and began to plead with him.

But he answered his father, ‘Listen! For all these years I have been working like a slave for you, and I have never disobeyed your command; yet you have never given me even a young goat so that I might celebrate with my friends. But when this son of yours came back, who has devoured your property with prostitutes, you killed the fatted calf for him!’

Then the father said to him, ‘Son, you are always with me, and all that is mine is yours. But we had to celebrate and rejoice, because this brother of yours was dead and has come to life; he was lost and has been found.’”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Welcome and Mercy

Sometimes, I believe that we have heard the Parable of the Prodigal Son so often, that we don’t or can’t hear it “anew” when it is used as the Gospel reading in today’s liturgy. What might be new about the parable or to the insights we might glean from it this time around? First, perhaps, is that the Father “divided his property between them.”  What that tells me is that the Father, so respected in a Jewish household, seems to have kept nothing for himself, and now must depend on the brother who remains at home for everything. And, while we are told that the younger son does indeed spend all of his share of the money on “dissolute living.” Then the father is put into the difficult position of defending his younger son–for whose return he had obviously been waiting–to his younger son.

When we have sinned, do we truly believe (as the parable leads us to believe) that God is actually awaiting our return?  Do we believe that God will be as generous, as merciful, and as forgiving as the father in the parable?

—Fr. Michael A. Vincent, SJ, serves as associate pastor of the Church of the Gesuin University Heights, OH.

Prayer

Holy Jesus, you spoke peace to our sinful world and gave us the gift of reconciliation. Help me follow the example Jesus gave. May my attitudes and actions this week turn hatred to love, conflict to peace, and death to eternal life. Amen.

—The Jesuit prayer team

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Let me have too deep a sense of humor ever to be proud.
Let me know my absurdity before I act absurdly.
Let me realize that when I am humble I am most human,
most truthful,
and most worthy of your serious consideration.

—Prayer for Humility by Daniel A. Lord, SJ

 

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Humbling ourselves before God

When contemplating a Scripture passage, St. Ignatius invites us to place ourselves in the role of one of the figures in the story.  As I pray with this passage, I find myself alternately drawn to seeing myself as the Pharisee and seeing myself as the tax collector.  It can be easy to look at the attitudes and behaviors of these too men as binary; one is either humble and repentant or proud and boastful.  But in reality I know that I fall in between these, and sometimes swing from one to the other.

There are areas about my life about which I can be honest and have great humility–my lack of athletic prowess, for example.  But there are other areas where I have blinders on, and the notion of being successful, or having achieved what I have through my hard work and dedication, can stand in the way of my relationship with God.  All that I have is gift, and my prayer ought to recognize this.

What are blind spots you have in humbling yourself before God?  What are the things we need to let go of in order to grow closer to our Lord?

—The Jesuit Prayer team

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Lk 18: 9-14

He also told this parable to some who trusted in themselves that they were righteous and regarded others with contempt: “Two men went up to the temple to pray, one a Pharisee and the other a tax collector. The Pharisee, standing by himself, was praying thus, ‘God, I thank you that I am not like other people: thieves, rogues, adulterers, or even like this tax collector. I fast twice a week; I give a tenth of all my income.’

But the tax collector, standing far off, would not even look up to heaven, but was beating his breast and saying, ‘God, be merciful to me, a sinner!’ I tell you, this man went down to his home justified rather than the other; for all who exalt themselves will be humbled, but all who humble themselves will be exalted.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 


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March 30, 2019

Lk 18: 9-14

He also told this parable to some who trusted in themselves that they were righteous and regarded others with contempt: “Two men went up to the temple to pray, one a Pharisee and the other a tax collector. The Pharisee, standing by himself, was praying thus, ‘God, I thank you that I am not like other people: thieves, rogues, adulterers, or even like this tax collector. I fast twice a week; I give a tenth of all my income.’

But the tax collector, standing far off, would not even look up to heaven, but was beating his breast and saying, ‘God, be merciful to me, a sinner!’ I tell you, this man went down to his home justified rather than the other; for all who exalt themselves will be humbled, but all who humble themselves will be exalted.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Humbling ourselves before God

When contemplating a Scripture passage, St. Ignatius invites us to place ourselves in the role of one of the figures in the story.  As I pray with this passage, I find myself alternately drawn to seeing myself as the Pharisee and seeing myself as the tax collector.  It can be easy to look at the attitudes and behaviors of these too men as binary; one is either humble and repentant or proud and boastful.  But in reality I know that I fall in between these, and sometimes swing from one to the other.

There are areas about my life about which I can be honest and have great humility–my lack of athletic prowess, for example.  But there are other areas where I have blinders on, and the notion of being successful, or having achieved what I have through my hard work and dedication, can stand in the way of my relationship with God.  All that I have is gift, and my prayer ought to recognize this.

What are blind spots you have in humbling yourself before God?  What are the things we need to let go of in order to grow closer to our Lord?

—The Jesuit Prayer team

Prayer

Let me have too deep a sense of humor ever to be proud.
Let me know my absurdity before I act absurdly.
Let me realize that when I am humble I am most human,
most truthful,
and most worthy of your serious consideration.

—Prayer for Humility by Daniel A. Lord, SJ

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Infinite Love, help me to see you in my neighbor. Help me to see beyond those things that distract me from your light that continuously shines through the people around me every day. I make this prayer through Christ Jesus, who is your invisible love made visible. Amen.

—Mark McNeil

 

 

 

 


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The light of God reflected in each of us

Why are love of God and love of neighbor the two greatest commandments? Morality only makes sense when we are talking about conscious, morally-free beings. Rocks, trees and squirrels cannot act “morally.” Each human person is a tiny reflection of the infinite, incomprehensible love that is God. If I could truly see you for what you are, I would, as C. S. Lewis somewhere observed, be tempted to fall down and worship before you. If I hate you, I have not even begun to see the God that made and sustains you. Since God “hides” behind his creation, if I reject the light of God reflected in you, I live in the darkness of hate. In that darkness, I have not even begun to understand what the commandments are all about.

—Mark McNeil is the assistant principal for formation at Strake Jesuit College Preparatory in Houston, Texas.

 

 

 

 


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Welcome to PrayLA

As a Jesuit school, Loyola Academy is rooted in the spirituality of St. Ignatius of Loyola. Daily prayer was an essential tool by which Ignatius reflected on his life and deepened his relationship with Christ.

We invite you to participate in this rich tradition of prayer.





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Prayer

Holy Jesus, you spoke peace to our sinful world and gave us the gift of reconciliation. Help me follow the example Jesus gave. May my attitudes and actions this week turn hatred to love, conflict to peace, and death to eternal life. Amen.

—The Jesuit prayer team

 

 

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Welcome and Mercy

Sometimes, I believe that we have heard the Parable of the Prodigal Son so often, that we don’t or can’t hear it “anew” when it is used as the Gospel reading in today’s liturgy. What might be new about the parable or to the insights we might glean from it this time around? First, perhaps, is that the Father “divided his property between them.”  What that tells me is that the Father, so respected in a Jewish household, seems to have kept nothing for himself, and now must depend on the brother who remains at home for everything. And, while we are told that the younger son does indeed spend all of his share of the money on “dissolute living.” Then the father is put into the difficult position of defending his younger son–for whose return he had obviously been waiting–to his younger son.

When we have sinned, do we truly believe (as the parable leads us to believe) that God is actually awaiting our return?  Do we believe that God will be as generous, as merciful, and as forgiving as the father in the parable?

—Fr. Michael A. Vincent, SJ, serves as associate pastor of the Church of the Gesuin University Heights, OH.

 

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Lk 15: 1-3, 11-32

Now all the tax collectors and sinners were coming near to listen to him. And the Pharisees and the scribes were grumbling and saying, “This fellow welcomes sinners and eats with them.” So he told them this parable:

Then Jesus said, “There was a man who had two sons. The younger of them said to his father, ‘Father, give me the share of the property that will belong to me.’ So he divided his property between them. A few days later the younger son gathered all he had and traveled to a distant country, and there he squandered his property in dissolute living.

When he had spent everything, a severe famine took place throughout that country, and he began to be in need. So he went and hired himself out to one of the citizens of that country, who sent him to his fields to feed the pigs. He would gladly have filled himself with the pods that the pigs were eating; and no one gave him anything.

But when he came to himself he said, ‘How many of my father’s hired hands have bread enough and to spare, but here I am dying of hunger! I will get up and go to my father, and I will say to him, “Father, I have sinned against heaven and before you; I am no longer worthy to be called your son; treat me like one of your hired hands.”’

So he set off and went to his father. But while he was still far off, his father saw him and was filled with compassion; he ran and put his arms around him and kissed him. Then the son said to him, ‘Father, I have sinned against heaven and before you; I am no longer worthy to be called your son.’

But the father said to his slaves, ‘Quickly, bring out a robe—the best one—and put it on him; put a ring on his finger and sandals on his feet. And get the fatted calf and kill it, and let us eat and celebrate; for this son of mine was dead and is alive again; he was lost and is found!’ And they began to celebrate.

“Now his elder son was in the field; and when he came and approached the house, he heard music and dancing. He called one of the slaves and asked what was going on. He replied, ‘Your brother has come, and your father has killed the fatted calf, because he has got him back safe and sound.’ Then he became angry and refused to go in. His father came out and began to plead with him.

But he answered his father, ‘Listen! For all these years I have been working like a slave for you, and I have never disobeyed your command; yet you have never given me even a young goat so that I might celebrate with my friends. But when this son of yours came back, who has devoured your property with prostitutes, you killed the fatted calf for him!’

Then the father said to him, ‘Son, you are always with me, and all that is mine is yours. But we had to celebrate and rejoice, because this brother of yours was dead and has come to life; he was lost and has been found.’”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

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March 31, 2019

Lk 15: 1-3, 11-32

Now all the tax collectors and sinners were coming near to listen to him. And the Pharisees and the scribes were grumbling and saying, “This fellow welcomes sinners and eats with them.” So he told them this parable:

Then Jesus said, “There was a man who had two sons. The younger of them said to his father, ‘Father, give me the share of the property that will belong to me.’ So he divided his property between them. A few days later the younger son gathered all he had and traveled to a distant country, and there he squandered his property in dissolute living.

When he had spent everything, a severe famine took place throughout that country, and he began to be in need. So he went and hired himself out to one of the citizens of that country, who sent him to his fields to feed the pigs. He would gladly have filled himself with the pods that the pigs were eating; and no one gave him anything.

But when he came to himself he said, ‘How many of my father’s hired hands have bread enough and to spare, but here I am dying of hunger! I will get up and go to my father, and I will say to him, “Father, I have sinned against heaven and before you; I am no longer worthy to be called your son; treat me like one of your hired hands.”’

So he set off and went to his father. But while he was still far off, his father saw him and was filled with compassion; he ran and put his arms around him and kissed him. Then the son said to him, ‘Father, I have sinned against heaven and before you; I am no longer worthy to be called your son.’

But the father said to his slaves, ‘Quickly, bring out a robe—the best one—and put it on him; put a ring on his finger and sandals on his feet. And get the fatted calf and kill it, and let us eat and celebrate; for this son of mine was dead and is alive again; he was lost and is found!’ And they began to celebrate.

“Now his elder son was in the field; and when he came and approached the house, he heard music and dancing. He called one of the slaves and asked what was going on. He replied, ‘Your brother has come, and your father has killed the fatted calf, because he has got him back safe and sound.’ Then he became angry and refused to go in. His father came out and began to plead with him.

But he answered his father, ‘Listen! For all these years I have been working like a slave for you, and I have never disobeyed your command; yet you have never given me even a young goat so that I might celebrate with my friends. But when this son of yours came back, who has devoured your property with prostitutes, you killed the fatted calf for him!’

Then the father said to him, ‘Son, you are always with me, and all that is mine is yours. But we had to celebrate and rejoice, because this brother of yours was dead and has come to life; he was lost and has been found.’”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Welcome and Mercy

Sometimes, I believe that we have heard the Parable of the Prodigal Son so often, that we don’t or can’t hear it “anew” when it is used as the Gospel reading in today’s liturgy. What might be new about the parable or to the insights we might glean from it this time around? First, perhaps, is that the Father “divided his property between them.”  What that tells me is that the Father, so respected in a Jewish household, seems to have kept nothing for himself, and now must depend on the brother who remains at home for everything. And, while we are told that the younger son does indeed spend all of his share of the money on “dissolute living.” Then the father is put into the difficult position of defending his younger son–for whose return he had obviously been waiting–to his younger son.

When we have sinned, do we truly believe (as the parable leads us to believe) that God is actually awaiting our return?  Do we believe that God will be as generous, as merciful, and as forgiving as the father in the parable?

—Fr. Michael A. Vincent, SJ, serves as associate pastor of the Church of the Gesuin University Heights, OH.

Prayer

Holy Jesus, you spoke peace to our sinful world and gave us the gift of reconciliation. Help me follow the example Jesus gave. May my attitudes and actions this week turn hatred to love, conflict to peace, and death to eternal life. Amen.

—The Jesuit prayer team

 

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Prayer

Let me have too deep a sense of humor ever to be proud.
Let me know my absurdity before I act absurdly.
Let me realize that when I am humble I am most human,
most truthful,
and most worthy of your serious consideration.

—Prayer for Humility by Daniel A. Lord, SJ

 

 

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Humbling ourselves before God

When contemplating a Scripture passage, St. Ignatius invites us to place ourselves in the role of one of the figures in the story.  As I pray with this passage, I find myself alternately drawn to seeing myself as the Pharisee and seeing myself as the tax collector.  It can be easy to look at the attitudes and behaviors of these too men as binary; one is either humble and repentant or proud and boastful.  But in reality I know that I fall in between these, and sometimes swing from one to the other.

There are areas about my life about which I can be honest and have great humility–my lack of athletic prowess, for example.  But there are other areas where I have blinders on, and the notion of being successful, or having achieved what I have through my hard work and dedication, can stand in the way of my relationship with God.  All that I have is gift, and my prayer ought to recognize this.

What are blind spots you have in humbling yourself before God?  What are the things we need to let go of in order to grow closer to our Lord?

—The Jesuit Prayer team

 

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Lk 18: 9-14

He also told this parable to some who trusted in themselves that they were righteous and regarded others with contempt: “Two men went up to the temple to pray, one a Pharisee and the other a tax collector. The Pharisee, standing by himself, was praying thus, ‘God, I thank you that I am not like other people: thieves, rogues, adulterers, or even like this tax collector. I fast twice a week; I give a tenth of all my income.’

But the tax collector, standing far off, would not even look up to heaven, but was beating his breast and saying, ‘God, be merciful to me, a sinner!’ I tell you, this man went down to his home justified rather than the other; for all who exalt themselves will be humbled, but all who humble themselves will be exalted.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

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March 30, 2019

Lk 18: 9-14

He also told this parable to some who trusted in themselves that they were righteous and regarded others with contempt: “Two men went up to the temple to pray, one a Pharisee and the other a tax collector. The Pharisee, standing by himself, was praying thus, ‘God, I thank you that I am not like other people: thieves, rogues, adulterers, or even like this tax collector. I fast twice a week; I give a tenth of all my income.’

But the tax collector, standing far off, would not even look up to heaven, but was beating his breast and saying, ‘God, be merciful to me, a sinner!’ I tell you, this man went down to his home justified rather than the other; for all who exalt themselves will be humbled, but all who humble themselves will be exalted.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Humbling ourselves before God

When contemplating a Scripture passage, St. Ignatius invites us to place ourselves in the role of one of the figures in the story.  As I pray with this passage, I find myself alternately drawn to seeing myself as the Pharisee and seeing myself as the tax collector.  It can be easy to look at the attitudes and behaviors of these too men as binary; one is either humble and repentant or proud and boastful.  But in reality I know that I fall in between these, and sometimes swing from one to the other.

There are areas about my life about which I can be honest and have great humility–my lack of athletic prowess, for example.  But there are other areas where I have blinders on, and the notion of being successful, or having achieved what I have through my hard work and dedication, can stand in the way of my relationship with God.  All that I have is gift, and my prayer ought to recognize this.

What are blind spots you have in humbling yourself before God?  What are the things we need to let go of in order to grow closer to our Lord?

—The Jesuit Prayer team

Prayer

Let me have too deep a sense of humor ever to be proud.
Let me know my absurdity before I act absurdly.
Let me realize that when I am humble I am most human,
most truthful,
and most worthy of your serious consideration.

—Prayer for Humility by Daniel A. Lord, SJ

 

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Prayer

Infinite Love, help me to see you in my neighbor. Help me to see beyond those things that distract me from your light that continuously shines through the people around me every day. I make this prayer through Christ Jesus, who is your invisible love made visible. Amen.

—Mark McNeil

 

 

 

 

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The light of God reflected in each of us

Why are love of God and love of neighbor the two greatest commandments? Morality only makes sense when we are talking about conscious, morally-free beings. Rocks, trees and squirrels cannot act “morally.” Each human person is a tiny reflection of the infinite, incomprehensible love that is God. If I could truly see you for what you are, I would, as C. S. Lewis somewhere observed, be tempted to fall down and worship before you. If I hate you, I have not even begun to see the God that made and sustains you. Since God “hides” behind his creation, if I reject the light of God reflected in you, I live in the darkness of hate. In that darkness, I have not even begun to understand what the commandments are all about.

—Mark McNeil is the assistant principal for formation at Strake Jesuit College Preparatory in Houston, Texas.

 

 

 

 

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