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We cannot remain neutral

Following Jesus does not allow us to remain neutral. Jesus’ passionate message here foretells both the suffering he was to undergo through the “baptism” of the cross, as well as the real opposition that would face his followers.

Perhaps the words of this Gospel need not be so unsettling. After all, the force of Jesus’ message is rightfully a cause for concern for those who feel threatened by the Kingdom which he embodies. As theologian Jon Sobrino, SJ, reminds us, “For Jesus, his task is not only affirming the truth about God, but unmasking the lies that suppress the truth about God.”

So, too, is it our task to denounce injustice, stand with the oppressed, and unmask corruption and dehumanization. To remain silent is to settle for a false peace that is unworthy of the sacrifice of Jesus, and the great cloud of witnesses who have trod the path before us.

—Marty Kelly is an Associate Chaplain at College of the Holy Cross and a Regional Coordinator for Contemplative Leaders in Action in Boston.

 


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Lk 12: 49-53

“I came to bring fire to the earth, and how I wish it were already kindled!I have a baptism with which to be baptized, and what stress I am under until it is completed! Do you think that I have come to bring peace to the earth? No, I tell you, but rather division!

From now on five in one household will be divided, three against two and two against three; they will be divided: father against son and son against father, mother against daughter and daughter against mother, mother-in-law against her daughter-in-law and daughter-in-law against mother-in-law.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 


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Prayer

I give thanks to you, Lord, who made the sun and rain. 
I give thanks to you for new growth that rises from fertile land. 
I give thanks to you for the harvests of grain, for nourishing bread. 
I give thanks to you for all your great bounty. 
Surely we taste your goodness today with truly thankful hearts.

—Adapted from a Prayer of Thanksgiving For a Farmer


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A little help from my friends

There’s always so much to do, especially when you work for God. Here we see Jesus preparing his disciples for “the harvest.” Jesus sends them out to the metaphorical vineyard in pairs, knowing that we are always more effective when we work together. There is strength and goodness in community.

We’re told that Jesus intends to visit these places too – another example of why the Incarnation is so amazing. Jesus is one of us – as a human, as a person who feels and has friends. He doesn’t ask us to do what he’s not also going to do. In all things, Jesus understands what we feel and experience.

We see, too, that Jesus cares for his laborers. He offers advice about their care and effectiveness. Be peaceful, be healers, be people who share the news of the Kingdom. Good advice for anyone who desires to live in the Spirit.

—Rita Zyber is RCIA and Confirmation Coordinator at St. Mary Student Parish at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, MI.

 

 

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Feast of St. Luke

Lk 10: 1-9

After this the Lord appointed seventy others and sent them on ahead of him in pairs to every town and place where he himself intended to go. He said to them, “The harvest is plentiful, but the laborers are few; therefore ask the Lord of the harvest to send out laborers into his harvest. Go on your way. See, I am sending you out like lambs into the midst of wolves. Carry no purse, no bag, no sandals; and greet no one on the road.

Whatever house you enter, first say, ‘Peace to this house!’ And if anyone is there who shares in peace, your peace will rest on that person; but if not, it will return to you. Remain in the same house, eating and drinking whatever they provide, for the laborer deserves to be paid. Do not move about from house to house. Whenever you enter a town and its people welcome you, eat what is set before you; cure the sick who are there, and say to them, ‘The kingdom of God has come near to you.’

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

October 26, 2017

Lk 12: 49-53

“I came to bring fire to the earth, and how I wish it were already kindled!I have a baptism with which to be baptized, and what stress I am under until it is completed! Do you think that I have come to bring peace to the earth? No, I tell you, but rather division!

From now on five in one household will be divided, three against two and two against three; they will be divided: father against son and son against father, mother against daughter and daughter against mother, mother-in-law against her daughter-in-law and daughter-in-law against mother-in-law.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

We cannot remain neutral

Following Jesus does not allow us to remain neutral. Jesus’ passionate message here foretells both the suffering he was to undergo through the “baptism” of the cross, as well as the real opposition that would face his followers.

Perhaps the words of this Gospel need not be so unsettling. After all, the force of Jesus’ message is rightfully a cause for concern for those who feel threatened by the Kingdom which he embodies. As theologian Jon Sobrino, SJ, reminds us, “For Jesus, his task is not only affirming the truth about God, but unmasking the lies that suppress the truth about God.”

So, too, is it our task to denounce injustice, stand with the oppressed, and unmask corruption and dehumanization. To remain silent is to settle for a false peace that is unworthy of the sacrifice of Jesus, and the great cloud of witnesses who have trod the path before us.

—Marty Kelly is an Associate Chaplain at College of the Holy Cross and a Regional Coordinator for Contemplative Leaders in Action in Boston.

Prayer

Lord Jesus, you stood with the poor, sick, and marginalized during your lifetime, and you call us to stand on the side of the oppressed in our society today.  Give us the strength to not remain silent in the face of injustice, so that we can work toward a more peaceful, just kingdom on earth.  Amen.

—The Jesuit Prayer team

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Welcome to PrayLA

As a Jesuit school, Loyola Academy is rooted in the spirituality of St. Ignatius of Loyola. Daily prayer was an essential tool by which Ignatius reflected on his life and deepened his relationship with Christ.

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We cannot remain neutral

Following Jesus does not allow us to remain neutral. Jesus’ passionate message here foretells both the suffering he was to undergo through the “baptism” of the cross, as well as the real opposition that would face his followers.

Perhaps the words of this Gospel need not be so unsettling. After all, the force of Jesus’ message is rightfully a cause for concern for those who feel threatened by the Kingdom which he embodies. As theologian Jon Sobrino, SJ, reminds us, “For Jesus, his task is not only affirming the truth about God, but unmasking the lies that suppress the truth about God.”

So, too, is it our task to denounce injustice, stand with the oppressed, and unmask corruption and dehumanization. To remain silent is to settle for a false peace that is unworthy of the sacrifice of Jesus, and the great cloud of witnesses who have trod the path before us.

—Marty Kelly is an Associate Chaplain at College of the Holy Cross and a Regional Coordinator for Contemplative Leaders in Action in Boston.

 

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Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Lk 12: 49-53

“I came to bring fire to the earth, and how I wish it were already kindled!I have a baptism with which to be baptized, and what stress I am under until it is completed! Do you think that I have come to bring peace to the earth? No, I tell you, but rather division!

From now on five in one household will be divided, three against two and two against three; they will be divided: father against son and son against father, mother against daughter and daughter against mother, mother-in-law against her daughter-in-law and daughter-in-law against mother-in-law.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

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Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

I give thanks to you, Lord, who made the sun and rain. 
I give thanks to you for new growth that rises from fertile land. 
I give thanks to you for the harvests of grain, for nourishing bread. 
I give thanks to you for all your great bounty. 
Surely we taste your goodness today with truly thankful hearts.

—Adapted from a Prayer of Thanksgiving For a Farmer

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Please share the Good Word with your friends!

A little help from my friends

There’s always so much to do, especially when you work for God. Here we see Jesus preparing his disciples for “the harvest.” Jesus sends them out to the metaphorical vineyard in pairs, knowing that we are always more effective when we work together. There is strength and goodness in community.

We’re told that Jesus intends to visit these places too – another example of why the Incarnation is so amazing. Jesus is one of us – as a human, as a person who feels and has friends. He doesn’t ask us to do what he’s not also going to do. In all things, Jesus understands what we feel and experience.

We see, too, that Jesus cares for his laborers. He offers advice about their care and effectiveness. Be peaceful, be healers, be people who share the news of the Kingdom. Good advice for anyone who desires to live in the Spirit.

—Rita Zyber is RCIA and Confirmation Coordinator at St. Mary Student Parish at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, MI.

 

 

 

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Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Feast of St. Luke

Lk 10: 1-9

After this the Lord appointed seventy others and sent them on ahead of him in pairs to every town and place where he himself intended to go. He said to them, “The harvest is plentiful, but the laborers are few; therefore ask the Lord of the harvest to send out laborers into his harvest. Go on your way. See, I am sending you out like lambs into the midst of wolves. Carry no purse, no bag, no sandals; and greet no one on the road.

Whatever house you enter, first say, ‘Peace to this house!’ And if anyone is there who shares in peace, your peace will rest on that person; but if not, it will return to you. Remain in the same house, eating and drinking whatever they provide, for the laborer deserves to be paid. Do not move about from house to house. Whenever you enter a town and its people welcome you, eat what is set before you; cure the sick who are there, and say to them, ‘The kingdom of God has come near to you.’

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

 

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Please share the Good Word with your friends!

October 26, 2017

Lk 12: 49-53

“I came to bring fire to the earth, and how I wish it were already kindled!I have a baptism with which to be baptized, and what stress I am under until it is completed! Do you think that I have come to bring peace to the earth? No, I tell you, but rather division!

From now on five in one household will be divided, three against two and two against three; they will be divided: father against son and son against father, mother against daughter and daughter against mother, mother-in-law against her daughter-in-law and daughter-in-law against mother-in-law.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

We cannot remain neutral

Following Jesus does not allow us to remain neutral. Jesus’ passionate message here foretells both the suffering he was to undergo through the “baptism” of the cross, as well as the real opposition that would face his followers.

Perhaps the words of this Gospel need not be so unsettling. After all, the force of Jesus’ message is rightfully a cause for concern for those who feel threatened by the Kingdom which he embodies. As theologian Jon Sobrino, SJ, reminds us, “For Jesus, his task is not only affirming the truth about God, but unmasking the lies that suppress the truth about God.”

So, too, is it our task to denounce injustice, stand with the oppressed, and unmask corruption and dehumanization. To remain silent is to settle for a false peace that is unworthy of the sacrifice of Jesus, and the great cloud of witnesses who have trod the path before us.

—Marty Kelly is an Associate Chaplain at College of the Holy Cross and a Regional Coordinator for Contemplative Leaders in Action in Boston.

Prayer

Lord Jesus, you stood with the poor, sick, and marginalized during your lifetime, and you call us to stand on the side of the oppressed in our society today.  Give us the strength to not remain silent in the face of injustice, so that we can work toward a more peaceful, just kingdom on earth.  Amen.

—The Jesuit Prayer team

 

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Please share the Good Word with your friends!