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November 4, 2016

St. Charles Borromeo

Lk 16: 1-8

Then Jesus said to the disciples, “There was a rich man who had a manager, and charges were brought to him that this man was squandering his property. So he summoned him and said to him, ‘What is this that I hear about you? Give me an accounting of your management, because you cannot be my manager any longer.’ Then the manager said to himself, ‘What will I do, now that my master is taking the position away from me? I am not strong enough to dig, and I am ashamed to beg.I have decided what to do so that, when I am dismissed as manager, people may welcome me into their homes.’

So, summoning his master’s debtors one by one, he asked the first, ‘How much do you owe my master?’ He answered, ‘A hundred jugs of olive oil.’ He said to him, ‘Take your bill, sit down quickly, and make it fifty.’ Then he asked another, ‘And how much do you owe?’ He replied, ‘A hundred containers of wheat.’ He said to him, ‘Take your bill and make it eighty.’

And his master commended the dishonest manager because he had acted shrewdly; for the children of this age are more shrewd in dealing with their own generation than are the children of light.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Abundant Life

“There is nothing more pathetic than caution
when headlong might save a life,
even, possibly, your own.”

Complacency and caution are tempting, because they seem safe and easy. Indeed, if you always play it safe, you will probably “be okay.” But the problem is, this is deceivingly harmful. Complacency and caution born from fear shrivel up our generous desires, limit our gifts, and dim the beauty in the world.

The truth is you are not made merely to “be okay.” You are made for abundant life, deep love, and bold faith! Life is far too short to be lived in cautious fear. So today, think of where you are complacent, too cautious, or afraid. Then turn to God, and let him remove those shackles. And like the steward, with wise and trusting boldness, go forgive debts, love the people around you, and accept the love and mercy you are given.

—Chris Williams, S.J., a Jesuit scholastic of the Wisconsin province, is studying philosophy at Loyola University Chicago.

Prayer

Moments

There are moments that cry out to be fulfilled.
Like, telling someone you love them.
Or giving your money away, all of it.

Your heart is beating, isn’t it?
You’re not in chains, are you?

There is nothing more pathetic than caution
when headlong might save a life,
even, possibly, your own.

—Mary Oliver

 


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November 4, 2016

St. Charles Borromeo

Lk 16: 1-8

Then Jesus said to the disciples, “There was a rich man who had a manager, and charges were brought to him that this man was squandering his property. So he summoned him and said to him, ‘What is this that I hear about you? Give me an accounting of your management, because you cannot be my manager any longer.’ Then the manager said to himself, ‘What will I do, now that my master is taking the position away from me? I am not strong enough to dig, and I am ashamed to beg.I have decided what to do so that, when I am dismissed as manager, people may welcome me into their homes.’

So, summoning his master’s debtors one by one, he asked the first, ‘How much do you owe my master?’ He answered, ‘A hundred jugs of olive oil.’ He said to him, ‘Take your bill, sit down quickly, and make it fifty.’ Then he asked another, ‘And how much do you owe?’ He replied, ‘A hundred containers of wheat.’ He said to him, ‘Take your bill and make it eighty.’

And his master commended the dishonest manager because he had acted shrewdly; for the children of this age are more shrewd in dealing with their own generation than are the children of light.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Abundant Life

“There is nothing more pathetic than caution
when headlong might save a life,
even, possibly, your own.”

Complacency and caution are tempting, because they seem safe and easy. Indeed, if you always play it safe, you will probably “be okay.” But the problem is, this is deceivingly harmful. Complacency and caution born from fear shrivel up our generous desires, limit our gifts, and dim the beauty in the world.

The truth is you are not made merely to “be okay.” You are made for abundant life, deep love, and bold faith! Life is far too short to be lived in cautious fear. So today, think of where you are complacent, too cautious, or afraid. Then turn to God, and let him remove those shackles. And like the steward, with wise and trusting boldness, go forgive debts, love the people around you, and accept the love and mercy you are given.

—Chris Williams, S.J., a Jesuit scholastic of the Wisconsin province, is studying philosophy at Loyola University Chicago.

Prayer

Moments

There are moments that cry out to be fulfilled.
Like, telling someone you love them.
Or giving your money away, all of it.

Your heart is beating, isn’t it?
You’re not in chains, are you?

There is nothing more pathetic than caution
when headlong might save a life,
even, possibly, your own.

—Mary Oliver

 

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Please share the Good Word with your friends!