Get the App
iOS Android

Easter Sunday

Jn 20: 1-9

Early on the first day of the week, while it was still dark, Mary Magdalene came to the tomb and saw that the stone had been removed from the tomb. So she ran and went to Simon Peter and the other disciple, the one whom Jesus loved, and said to them, “They have taken the Lord out of the tomb, and we do not know where they have laid him.”

Then Peter and the other disciple set out and went toward the tomb. The two were running together, but the other disciple outran Peter and reached the tomb first. He bent down to look in and saw the linen wrappings lying there, but he did not go in. Then Simon Peter came, following him, and went into the tomb. He saw the linen wrappings lying there, and the cloth that had been on Jesus’ head, not lying with the linen wrappings but rolled up in a place by itself.

Then the other disciple, who reached the tomb first, also went in, and he saw and believed; for as yet they did not understand the scripture, that he must rise from the dead.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

See and Believe

“Seeing,” “hearing,” “knowing,” and “believing” are all key concepts in John’s Gospel. Near the end of his Gospel, John the Evangelist tells us, “Jesus did many other signs that are not written in this book. But these are written so that you may come to believe that Jesus is the Messiah, the Son of God; and that through this belief you may have life in his name.”

In John’s Easter Sunday Gospel, Mary of Magdala comes to Simon Peter and to “the other disciple, the one whom Jesus loved” (very often identified as John himself), and tells them that the body of Jesus has been taken away from the tomb, and that she has no idea where it is. Peter and John then run to the tomb. John, yielding to Peter’s authority as the leader of the disciples in the Lord’s absence, bends down to look into the tomb, seeing only the burial cloths there, but doesn’t go in. When Peter arrives, he goes in, and finds the tomb empty, except for the burial shroud; but what seems most to impress Peter is that the cloth that had covered the head of Jesus was not on the ground, scattered or torn, but “rolled up in a separate place.”

Where that cloth was placed and how it was neatly rolled up seems to convince Peter that the body of Jesus was not stolen or moved, but that something else happened. And then, we are told, when the other disciple finally followed Peter into the tomb, he “saw and believed.” What will it take for us to believe? What will remove our every doubt? What experience of the power of the Risen Lord does God want us to have this Easter? May our prayer today be that we, too, will come to “see and believe.”

—Fr. Michael A. Vincent, SJ, serves as associate pastor of the Church of the Gesu in University Heights, OH.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Without seeing you, we love you;
without touching you, we embrace;
without knowing you, we follow;
without seeing you, we believe.

Without Seeing You by David Haas, © 1993 by GIA Publications, Inc


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Welcome to PrayLA

As a Jesuit school, Loyola Academy is rooted in the spirituality of St. Ignatius of Loyola. Daily prayer was an essential tool by which Ignatius reflected on his life and deepened his relationship with Christ.

We invite you to participate in this rich tradition of prayer.





Submit a Prayer Request

Archives

MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
22232425262728
2930     
       
    123
25262728   
       
   1234
262728    
       
  12345
2728     
       
      1
       
     12
       

DAILY INSPIRATION

April 21, 2019

Scripture

Easter Sunday

Jn 20: 1-9

Early on the first day of the week, while it was still dark, Mary Magdalene came to the tomb and saw that the stone had been removed from the tomb. So she ran and went to Simon Peter and the other disciple, the one whom Jesus loved, and said to them, “They have taken the Lord out of the tomb, and we do not know where they have laid him.”

Then Peter and the other disciple set out and went toward the tomb. The two were running together, but the other disciple outran Peter and reached the tomb first. He bent down to look in and saw the linen wrappings lying there, but he did not go in. Then Simon Peter came, following him, and went into the tomb. He saw the linen wrappings lying there, and the cloth that had been on Jesus’ head, not lying with the linen wrappings but rolled up in a place by itself.

Then the other disciple, who reached the tomb first, also went in, and he saw and believed; for as yet they did not understand the scripture, that he must rise from the dead.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 


Ignatian Reflection

Fear and joy

As Mary Magdalene and the other Mary leave the empty tomb to tell the disciples that Jesus is risen, they leave “with fear and great joy”. Fear and joy? This is an odd combination. But when God calls me to something new in my life, I have often responded this way. Moving to a new city? Fear and joy. Starting a new job? Fear and joy. Becoming a parent? Fear and joy.

St. Ignatius teaches us that the deep desires of our heart are God’s desires for us. For me, the experience of fear and great joy is often a sign that I am moving towards my heart’s desire. Margaret Silf writes that these desires “express the movements of my deepest underground streams and currents that spring from God and are known and understood fully only by him.” Sometimes we are called to leave behind something familiar to move towards the joy and fear of a new beginning.

On this Easter Monday, I take some time to consider Mary and Mary’s response to to the realization that their friend is risen from the dead, and that the path God is calling them to will be difficult, transformative, and beautiful. To what is God inviting me during this season of Easter that brings forth in me fear and great joy?

Katie Broussard is the illustrator of the picture book Audacious Ignatius and is on the Advisory Board of Jesuit Connections in Chicago.

 


Prayer

Imagine our deepest desire as a powerful underground stream, a promise of living water. This stream is so deep in our hearts that for the most part we are not even aware of it. When I let my prayer become this deep flow that I can’t even name or ever fully know, God is continuously responding to it. My prayer is not really mine at all but rather expresses the movements of my deepest underground streams that spring from God and are known and understood fully only by him. God’s answers are not brought about by my prayer any more than the sun’s movements are determined by the earth’s. Rather, my prayer is the response to God’s action in my life and his presence in my heart, just as the earth’s existence is a response to the sun’s.

Margaret Silf, Inner Compass: An Invitation to Ignatian Spirituality

DAILY EXAMEN

Based on the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius, this is prayed communally at Loyola Academy each school day.

  1. God, I believe that at this moment I am in your presence and you are loving me.
  2. God, you know my needs better than I know them. Give me your light and your help to see how you have been with me, both yesterday and today.
  3. God, help me to be grateful for the moments when people have affirmed me and challenged me. Help me to see how I have responded, and whether I have been kind to others and open to growth.
  4. God, forgive me for when I have not done my best or have failed to treat others well. Encourage me, guide me and continue to bless me.
  5. As I look to the remainder of this day, make me aware that you are with me. Show me how to be the person you want me to be.

PRAYER REQUESTS

VIRTUAL PRAYER CARDS


SUBSCRIBE TO EMAIL

Please complete the form below to subscribe to the PrayLA daily email.




We respect your email privacy. You may unsubscribe from Daily Inspiration emails at any point.